It’s a dog’s life

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Do you love dogs?  I love dogs.  In particular, I love my breed, the Doberman Pinscher.  I love their loyalty, their protective nature, their silliness and I feel safe when one is sleeping next to my bed.  If it were up to me, I would have one of my dogs with me at all times.  But it’s not up to me.

My job entails going in and out of other people’s homes several times a day, meetings and appointments that may last for a couple of hours, lunches in corner cafes and five star restaurants.  My dog isn’t welcome in many of those places, so I leave my dog home when I’m working.  I never take my dog anywhere he’s not welcome.  I was very ill last month.  I heard a dog collar in the hospital hallway on several occasions.  Finally I was able to get to the hallway and see a schnauzer walking by.  I asked my nurse “Are dogs allowed here?”  She said, “Yes, I see the all of the time”.  Can I have my brother bring my dog to see me?  “yes, of course, we’ll just shut the door to your room while he’s here”.  And I got to see my dog which helped me heal.

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That gets me to the point.  Dogs don’t belong in real estate.

I had a listing on the market when I went into the hospital.  I received a call that an agent who witnessed another agent in my listing with their dog.  The agent’s dog peed on my clients carpet.  I am laying in a hospital bed and I had to deal with this.  How unprofessional to you have to be to bring your dog to a sellers house and then allow it to pee on the carpet?  This agent should be run out of the business.

Dogs don’t belong in real estate.

I had an open house this weekend and not one, not two, but three different parties showed up to view the open house with their dog in tow.  I’m sorry, are you kidding me?  If you are previewing homes, leave your dog at home.  I can assure you that your dog will love any home you buy as long as you are there.  Dogs are like that.

Here are some of the issues to consider before bringing your dog to someone else’s home.

  1. The homeowner has cats who may become freaked out because your pooch’s scent is now in their space.
  2. The homeowner has dogs who may become freaked out because your pooch’s scent is now in their space.
  3. The homeowner’s pet mentioned in 1 and 2 above acts out due to the new scent and starts marking territory thereby destroying what was previously a nice and odor free home.
  4. The homeowner is severely allergic to pet dander and you’ve now polluted their home.
  5. The homeowner is a severe asthmatic and you’ve now sent them to the hospital.

An open house is a private home that has been placed for sale and is open for viewing by potential buyers.  The general public does not have a right to pass and an agent can refuse entry on behalf of the seller if the agent feels the seller’s private property at risk.  Agents can even restrict visitors to those who have provided the ability to purchase the property.

With one notable exception, dogs don’t belong in real estate.  There are a few agents in our area with situations where they have service dogs.  Service dogs can be used for a number of situations including alerting to seizures in their owners.  I am not talking about these dogs.  These dogs are highly trained, highly disciplined and highly necessary to their owner’s well being.  These dogs are an exception.

Every other dog, does not belong in real estate.